MACOM With Industry’s First Single-Chip Solution for 100G Bidirectional Optical Connectivity

Created September 25, 2018
Technologies and Products

MACOM Technology Solutions Inc has introduced what is billed as the industry’s first integrated, single-chip transmit and receive solution for short reach 100G optical transceivers, Active Optical Cables (AOCs) and onboard optical engines. The seamless integration of four-channel transmit and receive Clock Data Recovery (CDRs), four Transimpedance Amplifiers (TIAs) and four Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VSCEL) drivers within the new MALD-37845 is designed to deliver better ease of use and reduced costs.

Supporting a full range of data rates from 24.3 to 28.1 Gbits/s, the new MALD-37845 is designed for use in CPRI, 100G Ethernet, 32G Fibre Channel and 100G EDR InfiniBand applications. It will provide customers with a low power, single-chip solution suitable for small form-factor optical subassemblies. The chip supports interoperability with a variety of VCSEL lasers and photodetectors, and is firmware-compatible with earlier-generation MACOM solutions.

“Optical module and AOC providers are under tremendous pressure to enable their customers with 100G connectivity at volume scale,” said Marek Tlalka, Senior Director of Marketing, High-Performance Analog, MACOM. “We believe that the MALD-37845 overcomes the integration and cost challenges inherent to legacy multi-chip offerings, providing an elegant, high-performance solution for short reach 100G applications.”

MACOM’s MALD-37845 100G single-chip solutions are sampling to customers today, with production availability planned for the first half of 2019.

MACOM will be showcasing the new MALD-37845 at the European Conference on Optical Communication (ECOC), Booth 579, in Rome, Italy, September 24th-26th.
www.macom.com

 

 

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This article was written
by Peter Dykes

Peter Dykes is a independent telecoms and technology journalist who has over that last 30 years written for a wide range of B2B publications and companies. A former BT engineer, he specialises in networks and associated support systems. He is currently Editor of Optical Connections.