Avago’s 40 Gigabit Ethernet QSFP+ delivers 550m reach

Created March 14, 2013
Technologies and Products

A slew of optical transceiver announcements are expected in the coming days to coincide with the upcoming OFC/NFOEC conference and exhibition. 

The first CFP2 products – the CFP MSA’s 40G and 100G optical transceiver form factor that follows on from the CFP – are expected, as is further news of Cisco Systems’ own in-house CPAK transceiver. 
 
Announcements are also anticipated regarding the QSFP+. One of the first is from Avago Technologies, which has said that its new 40 Gigabit Ethernet (GbE) QSFP+ transceiver supports a reach of up to 550m. The eSR4’s reach exceeds the IEEE 40GBASE-SR4 standard and is being used to connect data centre equipment.  
 
The extended reach is required as data centre operators move to flatter switch architectures – from three tiers of switches to two – and as the nature of the traffic flows between switches changes with more traffic traveling between switches on the same tier.  As a result link distances are increasing, as is the importance of power consumption and port density. 
 
The eSR4 supports 40GbE or four independent 10GbE channels. When used as a multi-channel 10GbE interface, the QSFP+ can interface to various 10GbE form factors such as X2, XFP and SFP+ as well as 100GbE, says Avago. 
 
When Avago first announced the eSR4 QSFP+ transceiver, it had a reach of 300m over OM3 multimode fibre and 400m over OM4 fibre. The latest eSR4 extends the reach to a guaranteed 550m when used with OM4 fibre from fibre makers Corning, Commscope and Panduit. 
 
“The end user is going to move from OM3 to OM4 fibre for future proofing purposes,” says I Hsing Tan, Ethernet segment marketing manager in the fibre-optics product division at Avago. “The next-generation 32 Gig Fibre Channel and 100 Gigabit Ethernet are focusing on OM4 fibre.”   
  
By Roy Rubenstein

See Also: 

Press release: Avago’s Longest Reach 40GbE Proven with Leading Multimode Fiber Cabling Vendors

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This article was written
by Roy Rubenstein

is the editor of gazettabyte.com and has been researching and writing about the telecom and semiconductor industries for over 20 years.